If your kids are always glued to your iPad or laptop, then they'll love this subscription that teaches them how to code. Each box has an activity book with various coding projects, which kids develop into an app through the Bitsbox website. They'll be dying to show off their digital creations to friends and family, plus it gives them hours of entertainment.
Overbuying. While a subscription box usually costs less than buying all the items in it separately, there’s a good chance you wouldn’t buy all those items if they didn’t come in your box. For instance, a $29-a-month BarkBox subscription works out to $350 each year. Chances are, that’s a lot more than you’d normally spend just for toys and treats. Over the long term, it could add significantly to the cost of owning a dog.
How Much Control Do You Have? Some subscription services send the same monthly box to every subscriber. Others, such as Stitch Fix, tailor the contents to your personal tastes based on a questionnaire you fill out when you sign up. A few, such as Julep, allow you to preview each month’s box before it’s shipped and skip that month if you don’t want it, or even personally choose some or all of the items you receive. This means you’ll never have to waste money on an item you don’t want – but on the downside, your monthly box won’t be a special surprise.
Can You Really Afford It? Although subscription boxes can contain useful items, most of them are clearly wants rather than needs. Even if a box is a good value, it’s not worth buying if you don’t have room in your budget. Financial planner Katie Colman, speaking with LearnVest, says it’s okay to splurge on a monthly crate of goodies only “as long as you’re meeting all your other financial obligations and it’s not impacting your ability to meet your goals.”
Why We Love It: Trunk club is basically like having a personal stylist, but at a fraction of the cost. Their men’s and women’s style quiz is super thorough to ensure that each “trunk” is filled with clothing you’ll love. What’s even better is that you can approve its contents before it’s shipped to your door. Once you try everything on, you choose what to keep (and pay for) and send back the rest at no cost. You can do this on a monthly basis, or whenever you feel like you need to spruce up your wardrobe.
From food, fitness and fashion to puzzles, houseplants and gadgets, there's a subscription box for every taste and every hobby.The convenience of receiving cool merch, tailored to your personal needs, at your doorstep plus the eager anticipation of getting a surprise package in the mail (which totally brings out the inner child in all of us, btw), makes subscription boxes the best gift you can give to yourself or a loved one.

6. Love With Food: Looking for a guilt-free way to satisfy your 3 p.m. cravings? Look no further than Love With Food. Each box is filled with an assortment of healthy, organic snacks (think chocolate chip granola, honey apple oat bars and spicy fava beans).The boxes come in three different sizes: Tasting Box, Deluxe Box and the Gluten-Free Box. You can opt for a monthly, quarterly, six-monthly, or annual subscription. Plus, for every box sold, Love With Food donates a meal to charity. So you can stock up your pantry with delish munchies and contribute to a great cause at the same time.
Spice up things in the bedroom with this collection of different sensual products — perfect for those Saturday nights when the kids are sleeping at their friends' houses. You can choose from the lube of the month ($10/month), a toy of the month ($25/month), or the full on Spice Box, which features two full-size items, one or two "intimate" items, and two to three trial-size items.
"YogaClub is a women’s subscription service exclusively for designer yoga apparel. Each box delivers brand name athleisure styles at up to 50 percent off recommended retail prices every month or season. The company’s mission goes beyond empowering people to be active, they’re all about giving back. Every box delivered provides yoga and meditation education for elementary school children in at-risk communities."
×